Finalists

Francesca Mcloughlin

Why should you be selected?

I work hard to provide comprehensive, holistic, well-researched information on a wide variety of topics within sustainability and social justice. As well as promoting sustainable fashion I also try to answer difficult questions (e.g. what to do about palm oil or how ethical is Amazon – that piece took me a full week to write!), unpack complex issues (such as cultural appropriation or hidden slavery in supply chains), and always provide action points for moving forwards. I believe I’ve gained a strong reputation in the sustainable world for providing thorough work through an intersectional lens, that really helps people learn and understand the issues we’re facing. I try at every opportunity to use my voice for empowerment, compassion and to inspire action, but I also try and do it in a way that feels accessible and open to all, acknowledging and talking about how we need large and small scale change for a better world. I believe I’m a good writer, but I also believe I’m a trusted one.

What are your greatest professional accomplishments?

Recent sustainability accomplishments: speaking at Cambridge University and NEONYT Berlin, finishing the Amazon article and having that be shared so widely, working with United Bank of Switzerland’s sustainability team. As an artist: Working with the American Embassy in Finland, giving a lecture on collaboration at the American Resource Centre, being nominated for ‘most mesmerising performance’ at Gothenburg Fringe Festival, headlining ‘Poetry Moon’ festival in Helsinki, headlining shows in London, Melbourne, Paris and Newcastle, working with students in Colorado and performing with Battle Born Las Vegas, running my own arts festival in East London.

 

What are your greatest personal accomplishments?

Completing my masters degree and paying my loan back in the same year! Moving to Cornwall only knowing one person and managing to create a whole life for myself and find community, being maid of honour at my friend’s wedding in Tokyo, being able to travel as much as I have, and sticking through some tough mental health situations.

What work have you done to promote women’s empowerment?

Obviously sustainable fashion inherently promotes female empowerment as its a female dominated industry, but I’ve also focused a lot of time on mental health and intersectionality, which I think are vital to truly empowering everyone who identifies as a woman.

 

What is it about Purse for the People that you find inspiring?

I’m very passionate about craftsmanship, tradition and conservation, which I think Purse for the People truly embody. I love that you promote sustainable and slow methods within the rainforest, which is vital for biodiversity and our climate, while also supporting artisans who are harvesting these products and keeping their crafts alive. I also love anyone using natural materials over synthetic alternatives.

What does the #gratitude4thegoddess movement mean to you?

Lifting up the voices of anyone who identifies as a woman, especially those with minority/marginalised identities who often are overlooked. Respecting and revering indigenous cultures, uprooting oppression in all its forms, creating an atmosphere of freedom, safety and joyful expression.

 

What work have you done to promote sustainable living or environmental justice?

It’s basically everything I dedicate my time to! Whether it be writing blog posts, public speaking, or even performance and art installation. Everything I do is focused on educating, inviting discussion, changing perspectives and bringing more people into the sustainable world in a way that feels tangible, actionable and not overwhelming.

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Total Votes: 349